Cumann Seandálaiochta agus Staire na Gaillimhe

Galway Archaeological and Historical Society – Founded 1900

The Galway Archaeological and Historical Society (GAHS) was founded on the 21st March 1900 at the Railway Hotel to promote the study of the archaeology and history of the west of Ireland. Since 1900 the Society has published 70 volumes of its Journal of the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society. See our “Journal” menu links for more details. Most of our back catalogue of journals are now available through the online academic database JSTOR. The Society runs a lecture series in Galway City, as well as outings to various sites of interest during the summer. It is also involved in liaison with national and local authorities in relation to heritage matters concerning the City and County of Galway. We invite you to become a member, overseas members are also welcome. All members get a free copy of the GAHS Journal normally issued towards the end of the calendar year.… Read the rest
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What can fiction tell us about everyday life in Ireland and Northern Ireland during the 1930s, 40s and 50s? And perhaps just as importantly, what does it not tell us? Did male authors differ from female authors? Did the works of Catholics differ from those of Protestants? These, and other questions, will be explored by Dr. Caitriona Clear in this lecture. Novelists such as Patrick Purcell, Sheila Pim, John D. Sheridan, and Patricia O’Connor, are just a sample of those whose books will be considered. This presentation shall seek to ignite memories of, or stimulate curiosity about, these vivid and accomplished story-tellers; some of whom remain fondly remembered, whilst others are undeservedly forgotten. Dr. Caitriona Clear is a member of the Galway Archaeological & Historical Society, and lectures in history at the University of Galway. She has published widely on various aspects of Irish history, ranging from Women Religious in the nineteenth century, to women’s magazines in the twentieth. Dr. Clear was an invited contributor to the Irish President’s Machnamh 100 Seminar Series on Irish history in 2021, and is currently engaged with a number of projects, of which research on the contribution of Irish fiction to the analysis of… Read the rest
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For many decades, historians and commentators avoided examination of the Civil War, regarding it almost with embarrassment. So it was within families and communities too, where the ‘War of the Brothers’ was often discussed only in hushed tones, if at all. However, since the arrival of Michael Hopkinson’s ground-breaking Green against Green in 1988 things have changed, and authorities such as Tom Garvin, Bill Kissane and – most recently – Diarmaid Ferriter have published books on the subject. In this lecture, Professor Michael Laffan, will examine how our views of this conflict have evolved in recent years. A graduate of University College Dublin and Trinity Hall Cambridge, Professor Laffan lectured at the School of History and Archives at UCD for over three decades. A former president of the Irish Historical Society, and a sought-after contributor on matters historical for the national media, he has also published extensively on Ireland’s Revolutionary Period. His seminal work on the original Sinn Féin organisation, The Resurrection of Ireland: the Sinn Féin Party, 1916-1923, remains the definitive text on that subject; whilst his more recent biography of W. T. Cosgrave successfully addressed a previous dearth in academic examination of the first leader of the independent… Read the rest
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Léacht (Luan 14ú Márta: Harbour Hotel ag 20:00/8i.n.) Léargas ar an bpobal a mhair sa gceantar seo sa naoú haois déag ó thaobh cén uair ar tháinig siad ann, cé leis a raibh siad ag íoc cíosa, cén chaoi ar mhair siad ar muir is tír agus na hathruithe a bhí ag tarlú de réir mar a bhí an tréimhse sin ag dul ar aghaidh.  As Tír an Fhia sna hOileáin í Áine Ní Chonghaile. Thosaigh sí a saol oibre ag teagasc agus ansin chuaigh siad leis an aistriúchán, ceird ar chaith sí an chuid ba mhó dá saol oibre.… Read the rest
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The Arms Crisis of 1970: The Plot That Never Was(Monday 21 February 2022) The Arms Crisis of 1970 was one of the most controversial political events in twentieth century Ireland. The circumstances of the affair, and the infamous trial which captivated the Irish public, remain contested territory for historians, political scientists, and journalistic commentators today. Towering political figures of the time were swept up in the drama. Men such as Jack Lynch, Charles Haughey and Neil Blaney faced career making, and career breaking, challenges. In subsequent years, the semi-official narrative of ‘good guys versus bad guys’ has faced increased scrutiny.In this lecture Dr. Michael Heney draws upon a stimulating thesis from his recent best-selling book, where he challenges long-held assumptions with respect to who knew what, when, and why? Dr. Michael Heney is an historian and journalist. His career within both the print and broadcast media spanned four decades, having worked at The Irish Times, RTÉ Radio and finally with RTÉ Television. His investigative journalism resulted in the production of numerous award-winning programmes on subjects as diverse as ‘The Tallaght Two’, the Sallins Mail Train Robbery of 1976, and the Balkan Wars in Bosnia and Kosovo. In 2017 he was awarded… Read the rest
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Lecture 17 January 2022 A discussion of the implications for the Irish Republic, the North, and Ireland’s relations with the wider world On 6 December 1921, the Sinn Féin delegation led by Arthur Griffith signed the ‘Articles of Agreement for a Treaty between Britain and Ireland’ at Downing Street, London. From both a revolutionary and a constitutional perspective this was a seminal moment in Irish history. The Treaty itself signalled a formal end to the Irish War of Independence against Crown forces; debates surrounding it proved a harbinger for a bitter civil war; whilst its ratification by the Dáil ensured that it served as the foundation document of the new Irish state: Saorstát Éireann. In this lecture, hosted jointly by the Galway Archaeological & Historical Society and the Moore Institute of NUI Galway, Dr Mary Harris will examine this (still) contentious moment in Irish history, and consider its implications for the Irish Republic, the North, and Ireland’s relations with the wider world. Originally from Cork, Dr Harris studied history, Irish and Spanish at University College Cork. She also completed her MA in medieval Irish literature at UCC, before attaining her doctorate in history at the University of Cambridge. From 1992-1996… Read the rest
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Born in Galway, raised in Conamara, and educated at Rockwell and Blackrock colleges, Pádraic Ó Conaire (1882-1928) – or Paddy Conroy as he was also then known as – emerged as the most exciting and widely-read Irish-language writer of his generation while working as a civil servant in London. He returned to Ireland in late 1915, to begin a new chapter in his life. In this online lecture (20:00 Meán Fómhair 20 September) Brendan McGowan of Galway City Museum will provide an overview of Ó Conaire’s life and literary career prior to his return from London, before focussing on his activities from the time of the 1916 Rising to the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in 1921. Mr Brendan McGowan holds an MA in Heritage Studies from the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology and an MA in Museum Practice and Management from the University of Ulster. Mr McGowen has previously held roles with Glenveagh National Park in Donegal and The National Museum of Ireland – Country Life in Mayo, prior to taking up his current role as Education Officer at Músaem Cathrach Na Gaillimhe. Mr McGowen’s primary, but by no means exclusive, research interests concern the Gaelic Revival and Revolutionary period… Read the rest
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Ní mar a shíltear a bhítear. Is iomaí mí-thuiscint atá ag daoine ar cén saghas éadaí a bhí á gcaitheamh ag daoine anseo fadó. Tá liosta mór fada d’fháthanna leis sin agus ina measc is féidir linn an locht a chur ar Hollywood, na Sasanaigh, faisean, polaitíocht agus ár n-aeráid, dár ndóigh. Fiú leis na dúshláin sin, tá foinsí ar fáil chun tiacht ar eolas atá caillte le cuimhne na seacht sinsear. I léacht léargasach agus shuairc, beidh Tonaí Ó Roduibh ag dul i bhfad níos faide siar ná plé ar chultacha leipreachán, féillí beaga agus báiníní le cabhair ó shean-cháipéisí scríofa ag Gaeil agus ag Gaill agus ón seandálaíocht. ‘Item, that no man, nor man child, do wear no mantles in the streets, but cloaks or gowns… doublets and hose, shaped after the English fashion, of the country cloth or any other cloth [it] shall please them to buy. Item, that no man, woman, or child, do wear in their shirts or smocks, or any other garments, no saffron, nor have any more cloth in their shirts or smocks, but 5 standard ells of that country cloth.‘ Litir ón rí Sasanach Anraí VIII go Gaillimh. Nasc chuig an léacht… Read the rest
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The Society’s lecture on Monday 22 Feabhra 2021 was given by our own Dr John Cunningham, who spoke on aspects relating to Galway’s Claddagh community in the late 1800s. Central to the lecture was the amazing story of the crew of the St Patrick, a hooker from An Cladach, which set sail on the 13th November 1876 before encountering a tremendous storm on the way to Ceann Léime in western Conamara. Their families and neighbours had already given them all up for dead by the time news of their safe arrival in America reached home. This talk was presented in conjunction with the Moore Institute at Ollscoil Na hÉireann Gaillimh. Members who joined the live event on Zoom and Facebook were able to ask questions and make observations in real time using the chat and comment feature on those platforms. If you missed the talk, or want to enjoy it again, it has been uploaded to YouTube by the Moore Institute (open post to view). A lecturer in History at NUI Galway, John Cunningham is a committee member of the Society, a member of the editorial board of its journal, and a past editor of Saothar: Journal of Irish Labour… Read the rest
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Boland & Tom Barry 1973 Crossbarry memorial
Aontacht Éireann (1971-1976): The ‘Real’ Fianna Fáil? In May 1970, Taoiseach Jack Lynch dismissed the Minister for Finance, Charles Haughey, and the Minister for Agriculture, Neil Blaney, from Government. This action precipitated the public unveiling of what is generally referred to as the ‘Arms Crisis’, and threatened to tear the Fianna Fáil organisation apart. Outraged by Lynch’s actions, the Minister for Local Government, Kevin Boland, resigned from the Cabinet, and ultimately from Fianna Fáil. In 1971 he established a rival organisation, Aontacht Éireann. Despite initial enthusiasm, this new party would have little electoral impact and by 1976 had lost many of its founding members. In this lecture, Dr. Séan Ó Duibhir will provide an overview of Aontacht Éireann’s brief history. A number of its key political, social, and economic policies will be considered, and compared with the foundation principles of Fianna Fáil. Importantly, our audience will be presented with an interesting question: from 1971 onwards, were the members of Kevin Boland’s Aontacht Éireann, rather than Jack Lynch’s Fianna Fáil, the true inheritors of the original ‘Fianna Fáil’ philosophy? Note: start time revised to 9pm Direct link: https://youtu.be/3bUlDb4rw5g All Talks are available on the GAHS YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9qEeN8kuF80wWuRd1BT3aw    … Read the rest
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The Dáil Éireann in session in August 1921
Click here to visit GAHS on YouTube In this commemorative lecture, Dr. Séan Ó Duibhir, discusses a number of the practical, and symbolic, features of the Irish State’s ‘foundation moment’. The lecture was hosted by the Galway Archaeological and Historical Society at the Harbour Hotel, Galway, in 2019. Presented with audio and slides Subscribe to the GAHS YouTube Chanel here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9qEeN8kuF80wWuRd1BT3aw… Read the rest
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